Healthy Land and Water is dedicated to the care of our unique and beautiful land, waterways and biodiversity.

 

Our Clean Up program collects over 250,000 pieces of litter every year, helping to keep our SEQ waterways clean. 

 

Over 4,000 landowners have now registered for the Land for Wildlife program, helping to preserve our natural assets. 

 

More than 900 hectares of land was treated for weed control under our vegetation management programs in 2016.

 

In 2016, flood resilience solutions were applied to more than 63 kilometres of stream bank, helping to keep our waterways strong. 

 

Our Region

South East Queensland is home to a number of waterways and catchments. Healthy Land and Water monitors these catchments for the annual report card and other research data.

Have a look at each of the areas to find out more about our monitoring efforts, facilities available and how to get involved in the catchment. 
 

 

Albert River

The Albert River catchment covers an area of 782km2 and forms the boundary between the City of Gold Coast, City of Logan and Scenic Rim Regional Councils. The headwaters rise in the Gondwana Rainforests World Heritage Area of Lamington National Park, providing drinking water for the town of Beaudesert. The Albert forms the main tributary to the Logan River joining with it to form the Logan River estuary. The southern section of the catchment is extensively cleared for agriculture and rural residential areas.

Historically cotton and sugar plantations were the most prominent land use types along the river, however, it is the Alberts affiliation with rum production which gives it historical value. The mid to lower catchment is predominantly urban residential at Yatala and Beenleigh. Expanding housing developments within the region pose the greatest threat to management efforts to improve water quality within the River.

Healthy Land and Water is working with landholders, community groups, and State and Local Governments to undertake a wide range of works in the catchment including identifying and protecting wild Macadamia populations, strategic weed removal, rehabilitating remnant forest communities and raising awareness of local threatened species and ecosystems. 

 

Initiatives relevant to Albert River catchment

  • Fire and Biodiversity Consortium
  • Land for Wildlife
  • Monitoring Program
  • Representation on the Gondwana Rainforests World Heritage Area Advisory Committees

Monitoring

Healthy Land and Water has monitored seven (7) sites on the Albert River Estuary on a monthly basis since 2000.

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Bramble Bay

Bramble Bay is an embayment of Moreton Bay which extends from the mouth of the Brisbane River north to Woody Point at the Redcliffe Peninsula. Bramble Bay is the most degraded embayment of Moreton Bay. This is primarily a result of the high levels of nutrients and sediments that are transported into Bramble Bay from the Brisbane and Pine Rivers.

Monitoring

Healthy Land and Water has monitored 11 sites within Bramble Bay on a monthly basis since 2000.

Biodiversity

Historically, dugongs and turtles grazed on seagrass beds within Bramble Bay, but high turbidity and nutrients eliminated these beds at least 30 years ago. Current water quality conditions of Bramble Bay are unsuitable for the re-establishment of seagrass meadows. Nitrogen in the Bramble Bay zone has been decreasing since the upgrade of the Luggage Point Waste Water Treatment Plant (WWTP) in 2001. However, poor flushing continues to contribute to the poor condition of this catchment, the area possessing the longest residence time of Moreton Bay (59 to 62 days).

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Bremer River

The Bremer River catchment, with a total area of 2,031km², is the fourth largest catchment in the Western catchments reporting zone. The riparian areas along the reach of this creek are largely degraded and there is widespread erosion along the river and its tributaries. The Bundamba Sewage Treatment Plant discharges into the Bremer River Estuary.
In recent history the Bremer has had poor water quality with industrial waste flowing into the river soon after the catchment was settled. The slow-flowing river system is known to flood and during the January 2011 floods peaked at.19.4m at Ipswich, the third largest flood event in recorded history behind 1893 and 1974 at this location.


Water quality issues were evident after the 2011 floods resulting in the closure of the river for recreational use. Water treatment plants damaged in January’s flooding disaster caused the bacterial outbreak and while all were swiftly repaired, E. coli levels remained unsafe for several months. Industrial and commercial land use in the catchment has seen raised levels of heavy metals in creeks feeding the Bremer. Recent flood events have highlighted sediment loss and bank stabilisation issues in parts of the catchment. Healthy Land and Water have been working with landholders to actively target areas prone to erosion and build resilience into the system. They are working closely with Ipswich City Council and community groups to improve the Bremer’s water quality and initiatives such as the Bremer River Forum and the Ipswich River Heart Parklands (IRHP) are working to involve stakeholders and community groups in developing solutions to restore the rivers health.

Monitoring

Healthy Land and Water has monitored seven (7) sites along the river monthly since 2000.

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Brisbane River

The Brisbane River is the longest river in South East Queensland, flowing from headwaters in the Jimna, Brisbane, and Great Dividing Ranges down the valley and into Wivenhoe Dam, with middle reaches of river extending down to Mt Crosby weir and lower reaches flowing through the city of Brisbane before discharging into Moreton Bay. Early travellers along the river noted its natural beauty, abundance of fish and rich riparian vegetation. Dredging of the river from 1862 for navigation purposes sparked the end of Brisbane River’s clear water days. The constant extraction of river bed material had considerable effect on the river, with impacts including increased turbidity, bank and bed erosion and changed tidal hydraulics.

While the upper and mid-Brisbane catchments are dominated by grazing, natural bush land, agriculture and the main water supply storage in Wivenhoe Dam, the lower Brisbane catchment has been highly modified for urban and industrial use. Historically the Brisbane River received large amounts of treated sewage effluent including effluent from two of the largest sewage treatment plants in the region. Over the last decade there has been significant investment in upgrading Luggage Point and Oxley as well as other sewage treatment plants along the Brisbane River, aimed largely at reducing nutrient loading to the system and Moreton Bay.

 

Overall the Brisbane River catchment is considered to be in a poor condition and has been so for many years, however many of the upper reaches of less modified sub-catchments remain in good condition. The major causes of pollution are excess nutrients, hydrocarbons, pesticides and bacteria which become concentrated in the waterways and its sediment after flowing off surrounding lands. The main threats to waterways in rural areas is from channel erosion from stream banks, the loss and loss and degradation of riparian vegetation and runoff from inappropriate land management, particularly highly erodible soils . In urban areas the main sources of sediment is in runoff from development or construction sites, roads and cleared areas. 

Monitoring

Healthy Land and Water has monitored 16 sites within the Brisbane River on a monthly basis since 2000.

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Broadwater

The Gold Coast Broadwater is a large shallow estuary of water reaching from Southport to the southern section of the World Heritage-listed Moreton Bay, and separated from the ocean by Stradbroke Island. The entrance of the Nerang River was at Main Beach in the late 19th century, but by the 1980s had moved about 6 km northwards. In 1984, a project commenced stabilising the Nerang River estuary which links the Gold Coast Broadwater and Nerang River to the Pacific Ocean, to ensure a safer entrance for recreational and commercial boats. The Broadwater is also the low point in the city to which rainfall from several of the city’s major catchment areas drain. Subject to many years of human disturbance, the Broadwater and Spit require ongoing management to maintain environmental health, and retain their role as an important recreational and economic resource for Gold Coast residents and visitors.

Healthy Land and Water is working with community groups, City of Gold Coast and the Griffith Centre for Coastal Management to undertake a range of works in the catchment including raising awareness of local threatened species and ecosystems. 

Monitoring

Healthy Land and Water monitors nine (9) sites within the Broadwater.

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Cabbage Tree Creek

The Cabbage Tree Creek catchment covers 45km2 from the bushy foothills of the Taylor Range, through residential and industrial areas of northern Brisbane to Moreton Bay. Cabbage Tree Creek catchment is also home to the Boondall Wetlands, which with community requests is now Brisbane City Council protected for conservation and recreation purposes.

Sandgate Sewage Treatment Plant (STP) discharges into the Cabbage Tree Creek estuary. Upgrades to the facility between 2005 and 2008 resulted in total nitrogen reductions to the system. This estuary is flushed with poor quality water from Bramble Bay and being relatively small has a low dilution capacity compared to other estuaries that receive large flows from WWTPs.

Monitoring

Healthy Land and Water has monitored six (6) sites along Cabbage Tree Creek Estuary on a monthly basis since 2000.

Biodiversity

The catchment acts as a corridor for animals to travel from the large bushland areas of D’aguilar National Park to the coastal lowlands and wetlands, and bushland reserves. The largest protected wetland of this type in Brisbane, it is home to numerous animals including 190 species of birds and numerous marine and terrestrial fauna.

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Caboolture River

The Caboolture River catchment, with a total area of 468km², is the third largest catchment in the Moreton Bay Catchments reporting zone. The upper catchment contains the undistributed streams of the D’Aguliar Range. There are no dams on the waterway, except for a weir and the only major crossing is the Bruce Highway bridge. The Caboolture River is tidal for 19 km upstream to the Caboolture Weir. At the river mouth a sand bar reduces the impact of tidal energy.

Today, as many of Queensland's smaller towns decline, Caboolture is experiencing rapid growth. While agriculture retains its importance, it is becoming increasingly urbanised posing a threat to the river from land clearing and stormwater run-off. Two sewage treatment plants (STPs) discharge into the Caboolture River. Recent upgrades to the Caboolture Sewerage Treatment Plant have effectively reduced some of the pollution impacts.

Monitoring

Healthy Land and Water has monitored 10 sites on the Caboolture River Estuary on a monthly basis since 2000.

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Central Bay

The Central Bay reporting zone is an area of water within Moreton Bay beginning near Victoria Point in Redland Bay and spanning northwards to the south of Bribie Island. Moreton Bay is separated from the Coral Sea by a chain of three sand islands – Moreton Island in the north, North Stradbroke Island, and South Stradbroke Island in the south.

The bay contains several protected zones including parts of the bay protected as RAMSAR wetland. Moreton Bay is home to the one of the largest Australian population of dugong and several species of turtle, including the most significant population of Loggerhead Sea Turtle.

The waters are a popular destination for recreational anglers and are used by commercial seafood operators. However, after the 2011 floods, fishermen were warned not to eat or catch seafood in the area due to contamination from sewerage, pesticides, heavy metals such as lead and zinc as well as hydrocarbons.

Monitoring

Healthy Land and Water monitors 14 sites within Central Bay.

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Coomera River

With a total area of 489km², the Coomera River catchment lies within the northern part of the Gold Coast and extends into the eastern region of the Scenic Rim Council. The headwaters rise in Lamington National Park, part of the Gondwana Rainforests World Heritage Area, and then flow through farmland and rural residential areas. The history of the river suggests that it was primarily used to transport timber downstream to Moreton Bay. The freshwater section has poor water quality in several areas, showing high nutrient concentrations and occasional algal blooms and aquatic weeds. The estuarine section of the river has been impacted by modifications to the lower floodplain for canal estates, marinas and golf courses. This stretch of river is also a popular location for water skiers and recreational fisherman.

 

Healthy Land and Water is working with landholders, community groups, and State and Local Governments to undertake a wide range of works in the catchment including identifying and protecting wild Macadamia populations, strategic weed removal, rehabilitating remnant forest communities and raising awareness of local threatened species and ecosystems. 

 

Monitoring

Healthy Land and Water has monitored seven (7) sites on the Coomera River Estuary on a monthly basis since 2000.

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Currumbin Creek

The Currumbin Creek catchment, with a total area of 48km², is the smallest terrestrial catchment in the Southern Catchments reporting zone. The headwaters rise in the near pristine McPherson Ranges, part of the Gondwana Rainforests World Heritage Area, and flow through farmland and rural residential areas.  Currumbin Creek is situated in a relatively narrow and steep sided valley dominated by eucalypt forest and critically endangered lowland subtropical rainforest. Mangrove, saltmarsh and Casuarina forest patches are present in the lower reaches of the estuary, bordered by residential and commercial areas. The lower estuary provides a significant aquatic and shore-based recreational resource for the city, attracting fishermen, swimmers, surfers and boating enthusiasts. The mouth of Currumbin Creek is almost completely obstructed by a sandbar. A long history of coastal development, associated clearing and dredging has significantly altered the estuary’s riparian and benthic zones. Dredging of the creek mouth and estuary channel has significantly changed the ecology of the estuary.

 

Healthy Land and Water is working with landholders, community groups, and State and Local Governments to undertake a wide range of works in the catchment including identifying and protecting wild Macadamia populations, enhancing Koala corridors, rehabilitating remnant rainforest and raising awareness of local threatened species and ecosystems. 

Monitoring

Healthy Land and Water has monitored five ( 5) sites on the Currumbin Creek Estuary on a monthly basis since 2002

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Deception Bay

Deception Bay is situated at the northern section of Moreton Bay from Newport up to the south of Bribie Island and receives input from the Caboolture River, Pumicestone Passage and several other streams including Burpengary Creek.

Extensive seagrass meadows are present in the northern part of the bay but have been threatened by toxic Lyngbya blooms. Lack of seagrass recovery is likely due to discharge of poor quality water from the Caboolture River which remains a pressure on Deception Bay's overall ecosystem health. Poor flushing resulting in turbidity in that area of Deception Bay compounds the impact of this discharge.

Monitoring

Since 2002 Healthy Land and Water has monitored nine (9) sites within the Deception Bay reporting zone.

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Eastern Banks

The Eastern Banks reporting zone is an area of water spanning between Moreton and Raby Bay.  Eastern Banks is centred in the bay side zone between the south end of Moreton Island and the tip of North Stradbroke which includes the coastal waters around Crab Island. The zone is only very small, reporting 3 sites from mid 2000, consistently receiving high gradings for water quality since 2003. This small section of coastal space is the bay entrance between Moreton and North Stradbroke Island.

Monitoring

Healthy Land and Water has monitored three (3) sites since 2000.

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Eastern Bay

The Eastern Bay reporting zone is an area of water spanning between Moreton Bay, Raby Bay and Toondah Harbour. Eastern Bay runs along the bayside coast of Moreton Island and stretches across to the south eastern end of Bribie Island. The zone then runs down the coast side of North Stradbroke Island, wrapping around the Eastern Banks reporting zone as it passes between Stradbroke and Moreton Island. The reporting zone also includes Peel Island and the Eastern sides of some of the smaller islands including Lamb and Macleay.

Monitoring

Healthy Land and Water has monitored 11 sites since 2000.

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Eprapah Creek

The Eprapah Creek Catchment forms part of the Redland Creeks catchment and is the smallest of the Moreton Bay Catchments reporting zones, with an area of 281km². The Eprapah catchment has undergone rapid development from market garden and agricultural land to that of urban in recent years. The upstream catchment has been adversely affected by large-scale poultry farms, wineries, land clearance and semi-urban development. The recent works included the constructions of new shopping centres and residential lots less than 500 meters from the estuary in 2003-04.

Like most small subtropical estuaries, Eprapah Creek is characterised by short-lived freshwater flushing and low flow during the dry season. Although the estuarine zone includes two environmental parks, there are some marinas and boat yards, and a major sewage treatment plant which discharges into the creek. The creek ultimately discharges into Waterloo and Moreton Bay at Victoria Point.

Monitoring

Healthy Land and Water has monitored four (4) sites on Eprapah Creek Estuary on a monthly basis since 2003.

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Lockyer

The Lockyer catchment covers 2974 square kilometres across the steep ranges of the Great Dividing Range falling to undulating low hills surrounding lower Lockyer Creek. The Lockyer Valley comprises almost one quarter of the entire Brisbane River catchment. Rich in biodiversity, the Lockyer catchment is home to a range of native and threatened plant and animal species. It is also one of the world’s most fertile and productive agricultural areas.

Numerous dams impound the catchment including Atkinsons Dam, Lake Clarendon and Lake Dyer. Historically, plentiful water resources in the catchment have been used to irrigate extensive cropping from groundwater aquifers. However demand has exceeded sustainable yiel, especially during periods of drought, resulting in poor quality water with high concentrations of salt making it less suitable for irrigation. Highly erosive soils in surrounding hillsides and erosion of agricultural soil has also impacted on water resources, including drying up of waterholes and silting up of creeks.

Monitoring

Healthy Land and Water has monitored 14 sites on a monthly basis since 2000.

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Logan River

The Logan River catchment covers an area of 3,076km² comprising 5486km of stream networks. The headwaters rise in the Gondwana Rainforests World Heritage Area within Mount Barney and Lamington National Parks. The upper catchment of the Logan River Estuary has been extensively cleared for agriculture, mainly grazing and dairying, while the mid and lower reaches flow through rural and urban residential areas. There are several aquaculture facilities located along the banks of the Logan estuary near its mouth. The Logan River estuary directly receives treated sewage effluent from two sewerage treatment plants (STP) at Loganholme and Mt Cotton, and indirectly from the Beenleigh STP which discharges into the Albert River. Rapid urban development, agriculture, increasing heavy industry and overall population growth are putting additional pressure on water quality in the Logan River, its surrounding waterways and remnant bushland.

 

Healthy Land and Water is working with landholders, community groups, and State and Local Governments to undertake a wide range of works in the catchment including identifying and protecting wild Macadamia populations, strategic weed removal, rehabilitating remnant forest communities and raising awareness of local threatened species and ecosystems. 

Monitoring

Healthy Land and Water has monitored 12 sites within the Logan River Estuary on a monthly basis since 2000.

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Maroochy River

The Maroochy River catchment covers a total area of 630km². The river rises from the eastern slopes of the Blackall Range and flows east through a number of tributaries, before entering the sea at Cotton Tree through one of the last untrained river mouths on the east coast. Land use is mixed with agriculture, urban, rural residential, industrial, recreation and conservation all represented. There are three waste water treatment plants that discharge into the Maroochy River. Cooloolabin, Wappa and Poona Dams impound the freshwater on the South Maroochy River.  

Healthy Land and Water is working with landholders, community groups, utilities and all three levels of government to undertake a wide range of works in the catchment including saltmarsh and mangrove protection and restoration, strategic weed removal, rehabilitating remnant forest communities, agricultural soil improvement, sustainable horse management and raising awareness of local threatened species and ecosystems. 

Monitoring:

Healthy Land and Water has monitored 10 sites on the Maroochy River Estuary on a monthly basis since 2000.

Biodiversity:

Despite the relatively dense land use, the Maroochy River catchment supports a wide range of ecosystems and species, including endangered rainforests and saltmarsh and species such as the water mouse, giant barred frog and migratory birds.

Recreation

The Maroochy River is a popular spot for swimming, fishing, sailing, paddle boarding and jet skiing. There are no houseboats and the bar is difficult to navigate. 

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Mooloolah River

The Mooloolah River catchment with a total area of 223km², is the smallest catchment in the Northern Catchments area.The river rises from the eastern slopes of the Blackall Range and flows east-northeast to reach the sea at Mooloolaba.

The riparian vegetation is largely intact in the upper reaches, while the lower reaches have been modified with housing and canal estates. There are no wastewater treatment plants that discharge to the Mooloolah River. Ewen Maddock Dam impounds freshwater on Addlington Creek.

Healthy Land and Water is working with landholders, community groups and all levels of government to undertake a range of works in the catchment including strategic weed removal, biocontrol breeding, rehabilitating remnant forest communities, raising awareness of threatened species and ecosystems, saltmarsh and mangrove mapping and landslip rehabilitation.


Monitoring:  

Healthy Land and water has monitored seven sites monthly on the Mooloolah River estuary since 2000.

 

Biodiversity: 

The catchment has a wide variety of valuable remnants of coastal lowland habitat including rainforest, open eucalypt woodlands, melaleuca forests, wallum banksia woodlands, scribbly gum open forests, wallum heath and sedgeland. Inland the endangered lowland subtropical rainforest supports many endangered species such as the giant barred frog.

Recreation: 

Mooloolah River National Park adjoining the estuary offers recreational walking trails. The estuary supports boating, cruising and paddle-boarding. State forests in the headwaters have recreational trails for walking and horse riding.

 

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Nerang River

The Nerang River catchment, with a total area of 498km², is the largest and most significant river system on the Gold Coast. This catchment includes the Hinze Dam, which provides the Gold Coast main water supply, and 928km of stream networks. The headwaters rise in the near pristine McPherson Ranges, part of the Gondwana Rainforests World Heritage Area, and flow through farmland in the Numinbah Valley. This broad valley is dominated by eucalypt forest on its slopes and remnant patches of critically endangered lowland subtropical rainforest along and draining into the river. The Nerang tidal estuary traverses through urban residential areas and receives runoff from the Carrara/Merrimac floodplain area before joining the Broadwater system and flowing into the Pacific Ocean via the Gold Coast Seaway. Multi-branched canal developments and a number of artificial tidal and freshwater lake systems have influenced and altered large areas of the floodplain. These developments provide a range of opportunities for many residents including boating and recreational fishing, and habitat for a range of aquatic, terrestrial and marine flora and fauna. The canal systems provide for drainage of stormwater and contribute to flood mitigation, but can periodically be subject to contamination via stormwater drainage.

 

Healthy Land and Water is working with landholders, community groups, and State and Local Governments to undertake a wide range of works in the catchment including identifying and protecting wild Macadamia populations, strategic weed removal, rehabilitating remnant rainforest and raising awareness of local threatened species and ecosystems. 

Monitoring

Healthy Land and Water has monitored 11 sites on the Nerang River on a monthly basis since 2000.

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Noosa River

The Noosa River catchment, with a total area of 854km, is the largest catchment in the Northern Catchments area. The Noosa River enters the Pacific Ocean at Noosa Heads, where substantial residential development has grown into areas previously occupied by the changing river path.

The Noosa River catchment has high environmental, cultural heritage and scenic values as it passes through the Noosa National Park and high agricultural values in the Kin Kin Creek catchment. It is also a much sought after recreation, tourism, agriculture and fisheries resource, which makes a substantial contribution to the local Noosa economy.

Healthy Land and Water is working with landholders, community groups, utilities and all levels of government to undertake a wide range of works in the catchment including strategic weed removal, rehabilitating remnant forest communities, mapping and rehabilitating saltmarsh and mangroves, erosion control from agricultural land and raising awareness of threatened species and ecosystems. 

Monitoring

Healthy Land and Water has monitored 11 sites monthly in the Noosa River Estuary since 2000.

 

Biodiversity

The river is noted for its populations of migratory birdlife. Land use within the catchment has a direct correlation to the ecosystem and waterways health with 61% being remnant vegetation, 33% rural and 6% urban development.

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Oxley Creek

The Oxley Creek catchment forms part of the Lower Brisbane River catchment and is Brisbane's longest and the only sand-based creek in the city. Oxley Creek discharges into the Brisbane River Estuary approximately 46km upstream from Moreton Bay. Residential and industry development, sewage, sediment, land clearing and sand mining in the catchment have greatly affected the water quality of Oxley Creek, particularly in its lower reaches.

Key environmental issues that face the catchment include:

  • rapid population increase and development
  • altered flow patterns of the creek causing active erosion
  • deteriorating water quality
  • increased noise and vehicle movements
  • waste disposal
  • invasion of bushland by exotic plants and animals
  • management of the extractive industries
  • day-to-day behaviour of residents and workers of the catchment.

Monitoring

Healthy Land and Water has monitored 5 sites on Oxley Creek Estuary on a monthly basis since 2002.

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Pimpama River

The Pimpama River catchment, with a total area of 171km², has 389km of stream networks. The catchment is bordered by the Albert and Logan River systems to the north and west, with the Coomera Catchment to the south. The river flows east under the Pacific Motorway through a low floodplain area mainly dominated by sugar cane farms and reaches its destination in the Broadwater and southern Moreton Bay. The catchment has numerous canal estates and a rapidly expanding urban footprint.  Lower estuaries are popular for fishing, boating and recreation. McCoy's Creek, one of the Pimpama Rivers major tributaries, is a declared fish habitat area and a zoned protected marine park. There is also a weir located approximately 3.5km upstream of the river mouth.

Healthy Land and Water is working with landholders, community groups, and State and Local Governments to undertake a wide range of works in the catchment including identifying and protecting wild Macadamia populations, strategic weed removal, rehabilitating remnant forest communities and raising awareness of local threatened species and ecosystems. 

 

Monitoring

Healthy Land and Water has monitored eight (8) sites along the Pimpama River Estuary on a monthly basis since 2001.

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Pine River

The Pine River catchment is the second largest in the Moreton Bay Catchments reporting zone, with an area of 825km². There are 1,770km of stream networks in this catchment of which 17km are defined as estuarine for reporting processes. Part of the upper catchments of the North and South Pine River are between Brisbane Forest Park and Bunyaville State Forest. North Pine River is impounded by the North Pine Dam and forms Lake Samsonvale. The Murrumba Downs STP discharges into the northern branch of the Pine River. This STP has not been upgraded over the course of the study.

Monitoring

Healthy Land and Water has monitored six (6) sites on the Pine River Estuary on a monthly basis since 2000.

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Pumicestone Passage

The Pumicestone Passage is a shallow enclosed waterway located between the mainland and Bribie Island. Tidal flushing of the southern passage from Deception Bay dominates the estuary and there is a net northern movement of water through the Passage.

A growing region, the area has seen changing land use and management in recent years. The Sunshine Coast Council’s Pumicestone Passage and Catchment Action Plan 2013-2016 cites agriculture, forestry and urban development as the greatest impacts on the Passage.

Healthy Land and Water is working with landholders, community groups, industry, utilities and all levels of government to undertake a wide range of works in the catchment including cultural fire management, erosion control on farms and unsealed roads, restoring shellfish habitat, mangrove rehabilitation, strategic weed removal, rehabilitating remnant forest communities, promoting community stewardship and raising awareness of local threatened species and ecosystems.

Monitoring

Healthy Land and Water has monitored 10 sites monthly in the Pumicestone Passage since 2000.

Biodiversity

This shallow narrow water body provides a wide range of habitat types including salt marshes, mud flats, seagrass beds and extensive mangrove systems which support a wide range of plant and animal species including endangered species such as dugong, turtles and over 370 species of birds. The Pumicestone Passage has been recognised as an internationally significant Ramsar wetland. 

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Southern Bay

The Southern Bay catchment extends from the Logan River mouth in the north to the Pelican Banks. It is made up of mangrove islands, seagrass beds and urbanised areas of Russell and Macleay Island and Redland Bay. Water quality is most affected by discharges from the Logan River which contributes high sediment and nutrient loads from both point and diffuse sources. Impacts are particularly noticeable after heavy rainfall when sediment levels in the rivers together with the typically long residence times in southern Moreton Bay result in reduced water quality, often for extended periods.

Healthy Land and Water has monitored 16 sites in Southern Bay on a monthly basis since 2000.

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Stanley

The Stanley River catchment covers 1535 square kilometres with the Stanley River and main creeks flowing south and west from headwaters in Blackall, Conondale, Jimna and D’Aguilar Ranges across floodplains into Somerset Dam before its confluence with the Brisbane River and Wivenhoe Dam. The dominant land uses in the catchment area include grazing, forestry (plantation and native forests), with intensive agriculture mostly occurring on floodplains and more fertile basalt uplands.  Almost one quarter of the catchment is natural bush land as National Park or Forest Reserve, with other main land uses being one of South East Queensland’s main water supplies in Somerset Dam and an increasing rural residential living footprint.

The Stanley River catchment is generally considered to one of the healthiest in the region, with riparian vegetation in the upper catchment in very good condition.

Some of the main threats to the catchment include increasing development and inappropriate management practices, weeds and pest animals, habitat loss and fragmentation, and climate change. The main threats to the waterways and downstream water quality come from channel erosion, sediment and nutrient runoff and the loss and degradation of intact native riparian vegetation, particularly from invasive exotic vines. 

Monitoring

Healthy Land and Water has monitored eight (8) sites on a monthly basis since 2000.

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Tallebudgera Creek

The Tallebudgera Creek catchment, with a total area of 110km², has 219km of stream networks. Like its neighbouring Currumbin Creek, the headwaters rise from the near pristine areas of the McPherson Ranges in the Gondwana Rainforests World Heritage Area and flow through farmland and rural residential areas. Upper riparian areas are reasonably intact with active programs to remove woody weeds and re-snag select reaches. Lower reaches are heavily modified by urban and commercial development, with the creek mouth altered by a stabilising rock wall.

Monitoring

Healthy Land and Water has monitored five (5) sites on Tallebudgera Creek Estuary on a monthly basis since 2002.

See Report Card results here

 

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Tingalpa Creek

The Tingalpa Creek catchment, forms part of the Redlands Creek catchment and is the smallest of the Moreton Bay Catchments reporting zone, with an area of 281km². The other major creek in this catchment is Eprapah Creek. There are 525km of stream networks in this catchment, of which 11km of Tingalpa Creek are defined as estuarine for reporting processes. This catchment has undergone rapid development from market garden and agricultural land to that of urban in recent years. There are two Sewage Treatment Plants (STPs) that discharge into Tingalpa Creek.

Monitoring

Healthy Land and Water has monitored seven (7) sites on Tingalpa Creek Estuary on a monthly basis since 2003.

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